Environment

  • THREE PAID “GUIDES” POSE NEXT TO THEIR  MURDER VICTIM, A GENTLE, ENDANGERED ELEPHANT December 8, 2017 THREE PAID “GUIDES” POSE NEXT TO THEIR  MURDER VICTIM, A GENTLE, ENDANGERED ELEPHANT… employed by the two rich white men there, that murdered him, and smugly stare into the camera…this barbarity is actually “legal” and it costs the killers thousands of dollars…and although Trump backed off on lifting the ban on elephant trophies being imported, they are still being murdered…these sick serial killers can still travel to Africa to kill the innocent…please, sign and share the petitions below to help protect elephants and lions the animal murderers…the mentally deranged being celebrated, while they are smiling next to their kill, shows a world, in decline….these criminally insane zoosadists are claiming murdering animals is “conservation”….humans are the real invasive and nuisance species here…KILLER “CONSERVATIONISTS” THAT HUNT, ... Read More
  • The significance of Antarctica as the world warms December 7, 2017 Why remote Antarctica is so important in a warming world  The Conversation.December 4, 2017 Chris Fogwill, Professor of Glaciology and Palaeoclimatology, Keele University, Chris Turney, Professor of Earth Sciences and Climate Change, UNSW, Zoe Robinson, Reader in Physical Geography and Sustainability/Director of Education for Sustainability, Keele University “……..What was once thought to be a largely unchanging mass of snow and ice is anything but. Antarctica holds a staggering amount of water. The three ice sheets that cover the continent contain around 70% of our planet’s fresh water, all of which we now know to be vulnerable to warming air and oceans. If all the ice sheets were to melt, Antarctica would raise global sea levels by at least 56m. Where, when, and how quickly they might melt is a ... Read More
  • India’s Environment Protection Act, 1986 December 5, 2017 In India, environmental protection was not much of an issue till the mid-1980’s. That is, environmental protection as a whole was never seriously considered. The government did enact various legislation pertaining to the environment in the 1970’s and 80’s; most notably the Water Act, 1974, Air Act, 1981, Indian Forest Policy, 1988. But it took two major pushes, one from the international community and one from the national community, to create the Environment Protection Act. The international impetus came in the form of the Stockholm conference in 1972, to discuss Humans and their role in the Environment. This legislation was a way to implement India’s promises for protecting the environment. The process received a major push when the Bhopal Gas Tragedy ... Read More
  • Celebrating conservation successes this International Cheetah Day December 5, 2017 This International Cheetah Day, celebrated annually on 4 December, the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) is celebrating the incredible success of its Cheetah Metapopulation Project. This project was launched by the EWT in 2011, and in just six years has grown wild Cheetah numbers in South African reserves from 217 to 328 – an incredible 51% increase in just five years! This is thanks to many private and state reserves that are creating safe space for Cheetah populations. Increasing human pressures on Cheetah include retaliatory killings in response to livestock attacks, snaring, poaching for skins, roadkill, and loss of space due to agriculture and urbanisation. These factors have contributed to a global decline in wild populations that has resulted in Cheetahs becoming extinct ... Read More
  • On the Killing of Elephants … Again November 16, 2017 Look at the picture above.  Somebody please tell me why some men see those majestic animals and their first thought is to kill them? I will never understand it, but then I am a lover of nature and do not seek to destroy that which I love.  This week, Trump & Co, in their determined effort to undo every single thing that Obama did, have overturned a ban on bringing the heads of slain elephants into the country from the nations of Zimbabwe and Zambia.  Now, read this sentence and tell me if you see something wrong with the logic: “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) said it has determined that hunting African elephants in Zimbabwe and Zambia “will enhance ... Read More
  • Why is shifting cultivation being blamed for land degradation? November 16, 2017 I’m on a study tour through South India, visiting different National Parks and scientific institutes. Today was my first day, and already, the lectures we had were extremely interesting… One of the lectures I really found fascinating was given by Amit Jose Kurian, a research scholar at the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and Environment (ATREE). It was about shifting cultivation, also called slash-and-burn cultivation or jhum cultivation. The question he intrigued us with was this- Does shifting cultivation really lead to land degradation or is that a misconception? WHAT IS SHIFTING CULTIVATION? A simple Google search gives us this definition for this form of agriculture- Shifting cultivation is a form of agriculture in which plots of land are cultivated temporarily, then abandoned so ... Read More
  • First Cheetah cubs born in Malawi in over two decades November 16, 2017 The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) and African Parks made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of Cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. Now, history has been made again, as the first cubs have been born to these Cheetahs, making them the first wild cubs to be born in Malawi in 20 years. In late 2016, the South African wild Cheetah population reached new levels, with most safe spaces for Cheetahs fully occupied. The EWT and African Parks thus began to plan for a reintroduction of Cheetah into Liwonde National Park, Malawi. Under the management of African Parks ... Read More
  • Europe’s biggest hydrogen-powered bus fleet and now the UK’s biggest hydrogen cell installation are both in Scotland November 14, 2017 With a little irony, ‘Oil City’, Aberdeen, already has the UK’s largest hydrogen-powered bus fleet. The buses hold only 40Kg of hydrogen and have a range of 260 miles. The project cost £19 million and will make a major contribution to improving air quality in the city. I don’t think Aberdeen has ever had a red alert for pollution levels, like London but it’s good they’re working to pre-empt such a situation in the future. Europe’s largest fleet of hydrogen-fuelled buses is in Aberdeen From the Scottish Business News Network: ‘Now the UK’s largest hydrogen fuel cell installation in the UK is being installed at the new Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre (AECC). From the Scottish Business News Network: The cells, which will deliver clean, ... Read More
  • 7 Endangered Species in Africa which need our Help November 14, 2017 1. Black Rhino There are fewer than 2,500 Black Rhino remaining with numbers still declining due to the current poaching for its horn. Facts One of the oldest mammals on the earth, Brought back from the brink of extinction once     before (1970s),These huge beasts can run up to 55mph (88kph), Found mainly in South Africa. 2. Pangolin One of the most endangered mammals on the planet due to poaching for its flesh and scales.    Also known as the Scaly Ant Eater  Very picky eaters, mostly insectivores  Rolls up into a scaly, almost impenetrable, ball for protection  Found in the tropical regions of Africa and Asia. 3. Elephants 80% of the African Elephant population has been decimated by trophy hunting and ivory poaching.  Currently 30,000 to 40,0000 are poached annually  Massive ... Read More
  • Why Rhinoceros? November 10, 2017 It is important to understand that rhino are not being poached because of the ban on the sale of rhino horn: ergo, lifting the ban cannot get to the root of the problem.Rhino are being poached because African governments have neither the political will nor the competence to manage their game parks effectively.Therefore, the savage persecution of rhino must inevitably continue, whether or not the sale of rhino horn is legalised.The only question is whether lifting the ban would mitigate a horrendous situation. The claims of the proponents of lifting the ban are hopelessly optimistic and unrealistic, but we should still remain open minded. The imponderables are such that no one knows.Will legalising the trade allow poachers to filter into the system poached horn – and pass it ... Read More